Full interview: Dragos Butufei, mentor in SIM’s community

Business Development, Healthcare, Advisory, Education

In this interview, you will meet an open man to share his experiences, always there when needed, a man for whom supporting other people is a great joy.

And a greater joy is for us to have him in the mentors' team for She is MOM community.

🕺 Who is Dragoș Butufei, and what does he do?

Dragoș is an optimistic dreamer who offers good and professional things for the clients he works with. He is 34 years old and a consultant. For about four years, he has entered the area of ​​professional services and helps businesses grow in the areas in which he has expertise. He has business growth experience, DNA being made up of sales, marketing, operational, and strategy.

Otherwise, Dragoș is a normal, nice man, a man who works hard and likes to do many things with impact in this big world.

🕺 When did you realize what you want to do?

I realized with all the lived experiences coming from the structured area, the corporate area. As a total experience, I have more than 15 years, years in which I had the opportunity to develop in large and substantial companies, such as Telemobil - Zapp, Related Pharma - being at that time the largest distributor of pharmaceuticals, with City Pharma's own chain of pharmacies in private medical systems such as Regina Maria and Medicover. I am grateful that I had the chance to experience these companies, and I realized that it is very nice to have such a chance. Without such structures, I would not have been able to do what I am doing now. Looking at the situation from another perspective, you are a small wheel in a big mechanism. In contrast, in a small mechanism, in an entrepreneurial system, things change, you become the main pawn. Then it's much more about you, it's you with your backpack, as I like to say. You take care of your system, your procedures, your safety, and you are 101% responsible for your activity and the decisions you make.

I've gotten to the point where I'm struggling with my biggest competition: myself. We have to push our limits because only we prove everything and only for us.

I consider life a trial, and if you don't try, you don't know what it's like. And here I don't mean to try everything, but we'll know what things are worth risking, somehow you feel when you find your place, you know where you are the best. I can't say that now it's my best, this whole situation with the pandemic affects us directly and indirectly, but in such situations, you realize that if you started on a path you go on, you realize if it's really your way and if it's your way no one will take it. Because all that remains is you, with your essence and experiences, are things that no one can take from you. Otherwise, there is life beyond the crisis.

I also had a shop. I closed it. It was an online business with educational toys for children, but it didn't work. But I wanted to try, and I did, and now that's all that matters to me. A new beginning followed. And I recommend everyone to try if they have a dream, make a plan and take action. Anyway, there is always a new beginning, and something doesn't work, something else works. And yes, it's complicated, sometimes you feel like leaving everything behind, not doing anything anymore, closing everything, getting rid of stress, but we have to find our balance and reason when you say you can't, you can still a little bit.

🕺 What does the balance between personal and professional life mean to you?

You know, I'm still preaching about it. Theoretically, I'm damn good. For example, I kept studying principles, the three of eight: eight hours of activity, eight of active rest, and night of sleep. But on a practical level, when I do a lot of things, I feel like I don't have time at all, and I combine the personal part with the professional part. Sometimes I can't have the same work time or what I like to do, but I adapt, and this dynamic seems to apply to everyone, which makes adapting easier.

Another thing that helps me is the rituals, and I think they can maintain this balance. For example, before we got into a pandemic, used the brain to do certain things, it had clear commands, you wake up at x, you drink coffee, you leave home, you get to worky, you have to deliver a project to a client in no time, stay z hours, go home. In this situation where many of us now work from home, wake up and participate in meetings in shirts and shorts, it happened to me too, I admit. But still, I leave this to an exceptional degree. Otherwise, I keep the rituals, and I still wake up in the morning. I drink the same coffee I usually drink, I do my exercises, then I go to work and try to stick to this program.

It is straightforward to debate this part of time management. Theoretically, it is simply that it becomes a bit more chaotic in practice. Everything is to always return to this balance that you have defined.

🕺 What does it mean for you to be a mentor?

Being a mentor sounds good! Thank God I've had many mentors around me, and I'm grateful for that. I also had the chance of a mentoring program, structured a program that helped me understand how the mentor-mentee relationship works.

The first time I thought that a mentor is an older man with a long and thick beard, a man with a long life experience, very wise, in the meantime, I realized that even a child could be your mentor.

A mentor is there for you at a consistent and regular pace, to support you in the steps you take so that anything done regularly can produce excellence. Everything that happens repetitively starts to be much easier, there is automation, and the errors are not so big. They decrease considerably.

For me, being a mentor does not mean teaching people who come to me something, not even remotely. It means guiding these people to give their own answers.

A mentor listens, understands, and further stimulates personal and professional growth and develops skills and knowledge. Mentoring is also one of the oldest approaches in management.

🕺 If you were to leave a message to readers, what would it be?

To identify what makes them happy, to find their place. I believe a lot in this law of attraction, you receive what you give, and when you give from passion, from what you like to do, you feel happy, you don't expect anything else, you know that you are doing your part.

I now remember a phrase a childhood mentor said to me: 'Boy, do good in this life, and then run.' That means don't wait to get something back. You've done well. Leave it there and move on. If it comes back at some point, it'll come back. If not, you won anyway.

And I would add something - to leave something behind. Everyone understands what he wants. Some can leave traces, others children, others nice projects. The idea is that each of us has unique things to give. It would be a shame to keep them for us.

It is important to get out of the comfort zone, reinvent ourselves, adapt, and, more importantly, keep our confidence and optimism.